We educate every student to excel and contribute in a global society.

Prospective Honors Students:
 
Reasons to take the class:
 
  1. It’s a rich curriculum covering (more or less chronologically) much of America’s greatest fiction, essays, and poetry.
  2. You’ll learn a lot about American history as well. (In fact, many students are successfully taking it along with AP US History, and enjoy how each course reinforces learning in the other.)
  3. It prepares you very well for the rigors of college humanities reading and writing.
  4. You’ll be with other students who love literature and take their reading seriously; discussions are deep and often so interesting that students keep talking about texts long after class is over.
  5. Because of #4, there is none of the busywork designed to keep less motivated students engaged (study Q’s, vocab quizzes, etc.)
  6. You’ll learn to read, discuss, and write about complex works with confidence, looking at different interpretations/readings that are equally grounded in the text.
  7. You’ll improve significantly as a writer.

Note:  There will be required summer prep work that will require reading at least 300 pages, annotation and a possible writing assignment.
 
 

 
 
Prospective AP English Students:
 
If the student earned a grade of B or better in Honors or a B+ or better in English 3, and enjoyed reading and analyzing the more complex works, poetry, then he or she should consider enrolling in AP Literature and Composition.  We should also suggest that if the student was not enrolled in Honors English 11 last year, but discovered during the course of the year that he or she would have preferred a more challenging English class, then that student should also consider enrolling in AP Literature and Composition.  As a teacher of AP English has says, “  Any teachers of regular juniors--please say something to your top students  about taking AP. If they like English and are curious and willing to learn they are a good candidate. My top student right now didn't take Honors so that's not always an indicator of success...”  Students who are interested in reading more challenging texts, including a good deal of poetry, and in learning how to critically analyze not only for meaning, but also for the structure and mechanics of complex writing, would enjoy the class.  Finally, AP is good for students who want to learn how to write strong essays quickly, and to improve their ability to think on their feet.
 
Note:  There will be required summer prep work that will require reading at least 300 pages, annotation and a possible writing assignment. 
 
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